Proposed Oti Region: History, facts vs secessionist propaganda - thoughts of a chief

Source: Nana Ogyeabour Akompi Finam II, OV. | Omanhene,Kadjebi Traditional Area | Former Me mber of Council of State
Date: 13th-april-2018 Time:  1:58:59 am

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I have in recent times heard and watched events with disdain purposed to derail steps following the acceptance and execution of an overdue request for the creation of the proposed Oti Region.

One such event was two demonstrations held in Ho and Sogakope respectfully.

 It is worth emphasizing that, the recent demonstration held in the Volta Region is highly misplaced. The demonstrators call the entire Volta Region Western Togoland.

The fact of the matter is that the term "Western Togoland" was dead since the time of 1956 when the UN plebiscite decided the matter once and for all. The result of the Plebiscite was 58% in favor of integration with Gold Coast soon to become Ghana. One other critical point is that Volta Region only existed after Ghana’s Independence.

Also, Anloland (generally the area from Keta to the south of Ho)  which was formerly part of the Eastern Region of the Gold Coast, and Tongu-land an independent zone under the British Crown, became Southern Volta Region and was added to the bulk of Trusteeship territory of Togoland from Ho to the south of Bimbila.

The Norther remaining half of the Trust Territory of Togoland namely Yendi and Mamprusi were added to Northern and Upper regions respectively. To call the Volta Region "Western Togoland" is totally misleading.

The table below shows the result of the Plebiscite in 1956:

Oti-stats

As of 1954, there was agitation in the Buem-Krachi area for provision of social and educational facilities in the area. The UN pressured the British Colonial power who was mandated to administer the Trust Territory to provide funds for this purpose.

Again in 1954, the Buem-Krachi entity nominated Nana Akompi Firam III Kadjebihene and one Mr.Mensah of Krachi to go to the UN in New York to address the 13th plenary meeting of the UN Trusteeship Council. They presented the case of deprivation in the area and called for integration of the area with Gold Coast which was soon to become independent.

A  Fact Finding Mission was sent in 1955 to visit the Trust Territory of British Togoland and a referendum (Plebiscite) held the following year (1956).

The Buem-Krachi Area now preferred to be called Oti region had appealed to several governments.

For the demonstrators who may not be privy to the lessons of history, the following chain of events may serve as an antidote;

In 1970, President Akufo-Addo and Dr. K.A. Busia’s government was petitioned, then in 1991 a delegation went to Chairman Rawlings; in 1995 a petition was sent to H.E President Rawlings; in 2001 and 2005 a petition was sent to H.E J.A Kufuor; in 2007 a delegation was invited to meet the Council of State. In 2016 an appeal was made to H.E John Mahama at several forums. In 2017 a petition was sent to H.E Nana Akufo Addo.

The creation of the commission of Inquiry to examine the creation of new regions we believe is the resolve of the two major parties -NDC and NPP to create new regions for Ghana.

I wish to state that, the creation of this region which covers a landmass of 52% with a balanced population and 8 districts out of 25 districts plus municipals of the Volta region is for development purposes only.

I believe the new region will open up for development; new investments opportunities, new educational facilities and more social facilities..

Finally, the creation of the new region will give us an opportunity to select a new capital that would be geographically and centrally placed on an active route. It will also be accessible and will provide a shorter distance from all corners of the new region.

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The author, Nana Ogyeabour Akompi Finam II, OV, is Omanhene of Kadjebi Traditional Area | and a former member of Council of State.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

 

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